slim
Closure is an illusion, the winking of the eye of a storm. Nothing is completely resolved in life, nothing is perfect. The important thing is to keep living because only by living can you see what happens next.
Patti Smith on Murakami’s ‘Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage’ (via slim)
kenyatta
kenyatta:

New app will keep you away from ‘sketchy’ areas

SketchFactor, the brainchild of co-founders Allison McGuire and Daniel Herrington, is a Manhattan-based navigation app that crowdsources user experiences along with publicly available data to rate the relative “sketchiness” of certain areas in major cities. The app will launch on iTunes on Friday, capping off a big week for the startup, which was named as a finalist in NYC BigApps, a city-sponsored competition.
According to Ms. McGuire, a Los Angeles native who lives in the West Village, the impetus behind SketchFactor was her experience as a young woman navigating the streets of Washington, D.C., where she worked at a nonprofit.
"How can we take large amounts of data and crowdsource opinions on certain areas?" she wondered to herself. "I brought that idea to a Lean Startup event in D.C., it got a huge reception and suddenly I was on my way."
The founders are also bracing for potential complications from an app that asks anonymous users to judge a neighborhood’s sketchiness. After all, fear can be subjective. And the site could be vulnerable to criticisms regarding the degree to which race is used to profile a neighborhood.
"We understand that people will see this issue," Ms. McGuire said. "And even though Dan and I are admittedly both young, white people, the app is not built for us as young, white people. As far as we’re concerned, racial profiling is ‘sketchy’ and we are trying to empower users to report incidents of racism against them and define their own experience of the streets.”

Doublespeak of the day.

If you are interested in working on an app to report incidents of sketchy apps, LMK.

kenyatta:

New app will keep you away from ‘sketchy’ areas

SketchFactor, the brainchild of co-founders Allison McGuire and Daniel Herrington, is a Manhattan-based navigation app that crowdsources user experiences along with publicly available data to rate the relative “sketchiness” of certain areas in major cities. The app will launch on iTunes on Friday, capping off a big week for the startup, which was named as a finalist in NYC BigApps, a city-sponsored competition.

According to Ms. McGuire, a Los Angeles native who lives in the West Village, the impetus behind SketchFactor was her experience as a young woman navigating the streets of Washington, D.C., where she worked at a nonprofit.

"How can we take large amounts of data and crowdsource opinions on certain areas?" she wondered to herself. "I brought that idea to a Lean Startup event in D.C., it got a huge reception and suddenly I was on my way."

The founders are also bracing for potential complications from an app that asks anonymous users to judge a neighborhood’s sketchiness. After all, fear can be subjective. And the site could be vulnerable to criticisms regarding the degree to which race is used to profile a neighborhood.

"We understand that people will see this issue," Ms. McGuire said. "And even though Dan and I are admittedly both young, white people, the app is not built for us as young, white people. As far as we’re concerned, racial profiling is ‘sketchy’ and we are trying to empower users to report incidents of racism against them and define their own experience of the streets.”

Doublespeak of the day.

If you are interested in working on an app to report incidents of sketchy apps, LMK.

mixheatrepeat
mixheatrepeat:

Experiment #3: Kitchen Quest
While Experiment #2 runs, let’s try something new. What if we made cooking (or learning how to cook) into a… game?
How It Works:
Every day you will receive a food-related quest via text message.
Text back a photo of the completed quest by midnight.
You’ll win points for each quest you complete. Extra points will be rewarded based on criteria like speed, creativity, etc.
At the end of the week, the person with the most points wins a mystery prize!
Sounds interesting? Register for Kitchen Quest here.
The game will start this Sunday, August 3, at 10pm.

mixheatrepeat:

Experiment #3: Kitchen Quest

While Experiment #2 runs, let’s try something new. What if we made cooking (or learning how to cook) into a… game?

How It Works:

  1. Every day you will receive a food-related quest via text message.
  2. Text back a photo of the completed quest by midnight.
  3. You’ll win points for each quest you complete. Extra points will be rewarded based on criteria like speed, creativity, etc.
  4. At the end of the week, the person with the most points wins a mystery prize!

Sounds interesting? Register for Kitchen Quest here.

The game will start this Sunday, August 3, at 10pm.

racebending
The problem, it seems, is actually the blinders—the inability to engage meaningfully in the conversation. According to the white fragility model, because white folks have the choice to move through the world not thinking about race very often, our race-thinking muscles atrophy and we (unless we consciously do some hard work thinking about these things) can collapse under the slightest weight when it comes to talking about it. We start to sputter, and get defensive, and become angrily dismissive instead of staying calm and talking it out in a sensible way.

Brendan Kiley’s piece on the Slog is a really good summarization of the whole Mikado/racist theater situation and the unbelievably problematic response. 

Seattle is a city with a race problem — and white liberals denying it isn’t making it go away. 

It’s like we’ve said before — even if you don’t see it as offensive, that doesn’t mean it didn’t offend someone, thus making it offensive. 

Our motto, with this and all situations like it: Just say you’re sorry and try to learn something, rather than doing mental backflips trying to rationalize why someone else’s offense at your action was the wrong response. 

ALSO — and here is a sentence I never thought I’d ever, ever type — go read the Yelp reviews. For the first time possibly ever in the history of that godforsaken website, they’re actually really insightful. 

(via seattlish)