codebuddiesblog

Reflections from CodeBuddies hangouts

codebuddiesblog:

The more hangouts I participate in, the more I’m realizing that people are itching to:

a) build their own projects using the technologies they’re learning;

b) learn from many different resources, rather than just one. In other words, sometimes it’s not all that helpful to just study from one tutorial or resource.

It may be time to change the landing page.

marniegelf
marniegelf:

“We have to continually be jumping off cliffs and developing our wings on the way down.” ― Kurt Vonnegut
Young children are very good at jumping into new activities and tend to experiment with materials and enjoy exploring, They tinker and use a hands on approach to learning. They try one way and if that does not work, often try another. 
So when does all of this change? Does school knock the explorer out of them? Do they become too afraid of being wrong? Directions should be an outline not a roadmap to a final destination. When do they conform and lose much of their creativity?
As educators and parents, I think we must celebrate the journey of art making regardless of whether the final outcome is a masterpiece. We must let them make a mess and play with materials. It is in this space that young minds learn to tinker again. Perhaps the scary space of the unknown is where they learn to use their wings and find solutions and create their own responses and visual language. Let’s encourage them to spread their wings and jump. Not only is this a way to encourage creativity but also freedom of expression and problem solving.  

marniegelf:

“We have to continually be jumping off cliffs and developing our wings on the way down.” 
― Kurt Vonnegut

Young children are very good at jumping into new activities and tend to experiment with materials and enjoy exploring, They tinker and use a hands on approach to learning. They try one way and if that does not work, often try another. 

So when does all of this change? Does school knock the explorer out of them? Do they become too afraid of being wrong? Directions should be an outline not a roadmap to a final destination. When do they conform and lose much of their creativity?

As educators and parents, I think we must celebrate the journey of art making regardless of whether the final outcome is a masterpiece. We must let them make a mess and play with materials. It is in this space that young minds learn to tinker again. Perhaps the scary space of the unknown is where they learn to use their wings and find solutions and create their own responses and visual language. Let’s encourage them to spread their wings and jump. Not only is this a way to encourage creativity but also freedom of expression and problem solving.  

We’ve got two weeks left in Orbital Boot Camp, and it’s been a really wonderful summer.

As the Boot Camp is primarily an educational program, the final output is a talk on lessons learned rather than a demo day.

There are over 20 students in the boot camp, so we’ve scheduled our final talks over two nights in order to ensure adequate air time for each student.  Each student will have 5 minutes and one slide to share, and we’ll go back-to-back.  The Boot Camp team will be doing talks as well.

Talks are open to the public, and we’d like to invite you all to attend.

Space is limited, so please RSVP:

If you are free both evenings, I would encourage you to come to both as the projects are all quite diverse.  We’ve set a limited number of pay-what-you-want tickets, and all proceeds will go towards paying for food and drink for the evening.

For a glimpse at what the students have learned so far, here’s a link to our blog.

Hope to see you!

gjb

When we try to write about Women in Product management, we don’t celebrate. Instead, we couch it as “women don’t feel comfortable going into pure technology.” We emphasize that “the role is full of soft skills.” We discuss how it’s “non-threatening,” for developers to have female PMs. Then we assert that “pure technologists are the ones with all the respect.”

Product Management isn’t just lady-person “soft skills.” No Product Manager would describe herself — or himself! — that way. Within the discipline, we portray things in a much more masculine manner. We talk about leadership without management authority, negotiation, and execution. Due to that, women work even harder at a lot of the nuances of PM than their male peers do.

If you think about most of the media’s current discussions about women in management, they also apply to the PM role. If you’re assertive about what we need to build, are you bitchy? If you react strongly to a proposed feature cut, are you emotional or passionate? It’s a precarious balance. During my career, I’ve gotten feedback that comparable male peers didn’t get. In no way is being a woman Product Manager easy.

brycedotvc
Underdogs are not popular because we are underdogs. Underdogs have to fight for everything. Underdogs have to fight to be heard, to be seen, to be respected. Of course we don’t want to think that we’re them. We want to think we’re winners, that we sit at the special table (you can’t sit with us), that we’re better than everyone else, but what are you winning? What did you win? Sh*t, what are you even playing, dog?