kenyatta
disabilityhistory:

shrinkrants:

- Laura Nader quoted from “Up the Anthropologist: Perspective Gained from Studying Up” at Upward Anthropology Research Community.
(thanks to protoslacker for calling attention to this article)

Image description: Text that reads, “If we look at the literature based on field work in the United States, we find a relatively abundant literature on the poor, the ethnic groups, the disadvantaged; there is comparatively little field research on the middle class and very little first-hand work on the upper classes. Anthropologists might indeed ask themselves whether the entirety of field work does not depend upon a certain power relationship in favor of the anthropologist, and whether indeed such dominant-subordinate relationships may not be affecting the kinds of theories we are weaving. What if, in reinventing anthropology, anthropologists were to study the colonizer rather than the colonized, the culture of power rather than the culture of the powerless, the culture of affluence rather than the culture of poverty?”
I recommend Karen Ho’s Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Street, which does exactly that.

Karen!

disabilityhistory:

shrinkrants:

Laura Nader quoted from “Up the Anthropologist: Perspective Gained from Studying Up” at Upward Anthropology Research Community.

(thanks to protoslacker for calling attention to this article)

Image description: Text that reads, “If we look at the literature based on field work in the United States, we find a relatively abundant literature on the poor, the ethnic groups, the disadvantaged; there is comparatively little field research on the middle class and very little first-hand work on the upper classes. Anthropologists might indeed ask themselves whether the entirety of field work does not depend upon a certain power relationship in favor of the anthropologist, and whether indeed such dominant-subordinate relationships may not be affecting the kinds of theories we are weaving. What if, in reinventing anthropology, anthropologists were to study the colonizer rather than the colonized, the culture of power rather than the culture of the powerless, the culture of affluence rather than the culture of poverty?”

I recommend Karen Ho’s Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Streetwhich does exactly that.

Karen!

sofiaquintero

…We could bear any amount of nerdiness if someone was truly smart. What we couldn’t stand were people with a lot of attitude. But most of those weren’t truly smart, so our third test was largely a restatement of the first.

When nerds are unbearable it’s usually because they’re trying too hard to seem smart. But the smarter they are, the less pressure they feel to act smart. So as a rule you can recognize genuinely smart people by their ability to say things like “I don’t know,” “Maybe you’re right,” and “I don’t understand x well enough.”

rosematsa

Orbital Boot Camp

rosematsa:

This started out as a sketching blog when I needed a space to upload some drawings a few months back, for the purpose of sharing them.

I have the bad habit of starting things and leaving them unfinished, hence the five or so drawings, and then… silence.

But I have a stronger purpose now, and it’s called Orbital Boot Camp. The person behind the 12-week long course is Gary Chou, who teaches Entrepreneurial Design at the School of Visual Arts, at the MFA level. The SVA course is also the inspiration behind the boot camp.

Orbital Boot Camp is not a startup incubator, in the traditional sense, and it’s not an accelerator. It’s a an opportunity for independent creators with very diverse interests to take their side project from idea to launch. It’s a learning experiment where the process matters just as much as, or more than, the end-result.

It’s exactly what I didn’t know I needed.

I will be blogging in this space about my project, and my overall experience at the boot camp, which has been fantastic so far.

Woot!

seamlesstl

Humble Beginnings

seamlesstl:

Entrepreneur -

person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.

I’ve had this entrepreneurial itch for as long as I can remember.  I remember my early risk-taking days, selling slice pops (those were lollipops shaped like delicious fruit) in the common areas of my suburban middle school to any classmate in need of a sugar fix.  

Each weekend, I would travel to the local corner stores in the heart of Hartford, CT to purchase the discounted candies for a dime a piece - 10 cents lower than the cost at the suburban candy stores.  And each school day, my peers gladly shoved their quarters in my clear plastic bag in exchange for my prohibited treats.  

Even in a tax and competition free environment, there were high risks.  Being caught with candy at any time would result in immediate confiscation of goods and a hefty fine - two days detention.  

Did I ever get caught? Sure.  How did I feel? Devastated.  But each time that I was marched to a room to sit for hours and stare at my lost inventory, all I could think of was how I could sell smarter the next time around.  And which relative I would ask to fund my next stockpile of flavors.  

It’s always great to hear how people start out.

marniegelf

Orbital Boot Camp- Week 1

marniegelf:

New things….

This week i started the Orbital Boot Camp. Very excited to challenge myself to iterate and bring to life my ideas. I have been teaching art to children for over 13 years and just love it. I am so excited when children get in the zone and get lost in the art of creating. It is so liberating! So many wonderful things happen when children explore the world of art as it carries over into other areas of study. Sometimes children make what they consider a mistake, but in reality there lies an opportunity to find an alternative route. Most of the children I teach know that when a child says, “I made a mistake, I need another piece of paper”, I will respond by saying, “You are one of the lucky ones. You get to find a solution, you get to change this into something else.” Life does not offer us another piece of paper, but it does offer us the opportunity to find solutions. Art imitates life and I think a children’s art program can be a great petri dish for this. 

This week, I started a class which will allow me to move towards teaching art online. I am excited to connect with talented students and teachers. Even though each of our products are different, we will grow from the experience of working together and learning the from each other. It is important to jump into unchartered territories and share what one loves. Life is short…jump! 

Indeed!

Visiting the 2014 Venture for America Fellows

I’ve had the privilege of visiting with and speaking to the Venture for America fellows at their summer boot camp for each of the past two years, and was excited to be invited back again this year.  

Their boot camp takes place in Providence, which is about a 3+ hour train ride up from New York.  So, the ride up ends up being a nice forcing function for me to reflect on what I’ve learned over the past year.

I’ve had a lot going on in the past 12 months, so there was much to cram in.  And in fact I realized afterwards that there was a lot that I actually left out.  While I’ve written publicly why I launched Orbital Boot Camp, I haven’t talked specifically about why I started Orbital, itself.  Perhaps that is a future talk.

In any event, here’s a hackpad of notes to my talk.

And also, a summary of the talk, as tweeted by the 2014 VFA Fellows:

annelibby

annelibby:

Here’s a webinar on culture I did in 2012 for Startup America.  Before yesterday, I hadn’t seen it.  

It was originally behind Startup America’s membership wall.  Last year when I reached out to ask them to share the video file with me, I didn’t get a response.   (#frustrating)  

So it was a funny surprise to uncover the video yesterday via a Google video search.

When Startup American invited me to make this presentation back in 2012, I was glad for the platform to share my thinking.   I had never done a webinar before, and also decided to participate for the “webinar” learning experience.

This was one of many experiments I’ve made in creating content for other people to deliver.  

Overall, I’ve learned that I prefer to own the delivery of my content.  

I tweet.  I blog, occasionally.   And I’m open to new experiments.

The webinar?  I couldn’t see the participants, whether what I was saying made sense to them.  Not optimal.   (I can hear the strain of this in my own voice.) 

Also, the topic would have been better addressed in a shorter formal presentation and a more lively and interactive Q&A.

This affirms my current thinking.  For the most part, my offering is best made in a real-life exchange.   My client work is all IRL, most often one-on-one.

My online search was prompted by an effort to inventory on-and-offline content I’ve created, to sweep out my file drawers, and figure out some good ways to offer some of my thinking more broadly.  

And definitely In Real Life.

This is where I’m starting with my “side project”, guided by Gary Chou and his great team in their inaugural session of the Orbital Boot Camp.  

A friend said, “So, you’re getting coaching for your coaching business?!?”   I could have quibbled about whether I actually have a coaching business, or a consulting business.  

Instead, I just said, “Yes.”