orbitalnyc

sayangel:

Today marks the beginning of my 12 weeks as part of Orbital NYC’s Bootcamp. About a month ago I left my full-time position at Nanotronics Imaging to pursue development of vrban.

Vrban started off as a hack at the TechCrunch Disrupt NYC hackathon, where after 24 hours of hair…

We’re in Week 9 of the Boot Camp but we’re just getting underway with our new blog with all things at Orbital. Follow along here: http://blog.orbitalnyc.com

tonyhschu

Sometimes I’ll get a call or email from someone five years after the last contact and I’ll think, oh right, I hated that person. But they would never have known, of course. Let’s see if I still hate them. Very often I find that I don’t. Or that I hated them for a dumb reason. Or that they were having a bad day. Or much more likely, that I had been having a bad day.

People silently struggle from all kinds of terrible things. They suffer from depression, ambition, substance abuse, and pretension. They suffer from family tragedy, Ivy-League educations, and self-loathing. They suffer from failing marriages, physical pain, and publishing. The good thing about politeness is that you can treat these people exactly the same. And then wait to see what happens. You don’t have to have an opinion. You don’t need to make a judgment. I know that doesn’t sound like liberation, because we live and work in an opinion-based economy. But it is.

slavin
slavin:

"The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying." 

(via America Is Not For Black People)

—

This is from an article that Jenna Wortham describes as “the hardest thing I’ve ever read” and I feel like, while I’ve read even worse than this, it’s not a competition I’m interested in. It’s horrorshow. 

The article itself is much bigger and more important than this particular quote — which I think is really the broadest point made. It resists summary or reduction, and that’s one reason to read it.

slavin:

"The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying."

(via America Is Not For Black People)

This is from an article that Jenna Wortham describes as “the hardest thing I’ve ever read” and I feel like, while I’ve read even worse than this, it’s not a competition I’m interested in. It’s horrorshow.

The article itself is much bigger and more important than this particular quote — which I think is really the broadest point made. It resists summary or reduction, and that’s one reason to read it.

kenyatta
I don’t care if Mike Brown was going to college soon. This should not matter. We should not have to prove Mike Brown was worthy of living. We should not have to account for the ways in which he is suitably respectable. We should not have to prove that his body did not deserve to be riddled with bullets. His community should not have to silence their anger so they won’t be accused of rioting, so they won’t become targets too.
slavin
While I expected that what I saw might change, what I never expected was the impact my behavior would have on my friends’ feeds. I kept thinking Facebook would rate-limit me, but instead it grew increasingly ravenous. My feed become a cavalcade of brands and politics and as I interacted with them, Facebook dutifully reported this to all my friends and followers.

That first night, a small little circle with a dog’s head popped up in the corner of my phone. A chat head, from Facebook’s Messenger software! The dog turned out to be my old WIRED editor, John Bradley. “Have you been hacked,” he wanted to know. The next morning, my friend Helena sent me a message. “My fb feed is literally full of articles you like, it’s kind of funny,” she says. “No friend stuff, just Honan likes.” I replied with a thumbs up. This continued throughout the experiment. When I posted a status update to Facebook just saying “I like you,” I heard from numerous people that my weirdo activity had been overrunning their feeds. “My newsfeed is 70 percent things Mat has liked,” noted my pal Heather. Eventually, I would hear from someone who worked at Facebook, who had noticed my activity and wanted to connect me with the company’s PR department.

I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me | Gadget Lab | WIRED

There are a lot of interesting things in this article about the effects of “liking everything” on FB. But far as I’m concerned, that last sentence is really the gem.

(via slavin)